Ah, September: the biggest month of the year as far as fashion and our favorite glossies go. We expect magazines to pull out all the stops in these mega issues, and this year they certainly don’t disappoint. Today, Vogue confirmed that its September cover boasts not one, but three of-the-moment models. The interior spread expands to show six more, for a total count of nine dazzling women.

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Image via Vogue.com

Not only were these cover girls chosen for their prowess in front of the lens, but Vogue also dubs them “the Instagirls,” a generation of social media–savvy models rapidly building their own personal brands. From left to right, you see Joan Smalls, Cara Delevingne, and Karlie Kloss (all on the cover itself), followed by Arizona Muse, Edie Campbell, Imaan Hammam, Fei Fei Sun, Vanessa Axente, and Andreea Diaconu.

The sunny spread, filled with striking fall textiles, was shot by famed photographer Mario Testino. If this layout looks familiar, it might be because ten years ago the magazine also featured nine supermodels (including Gisele Bündchen and Daria Werbowy) on its September issue cover, photographed by Steven Meisel.

With major titles (Vogue and W included) hinting at a new class of top models, I suspect that Karlie and Cara are reaching the level of 90s-era Cindy and Kate. Except now they’re not just household names – their fandom extends throughout the Internet, too.

By Susie Kostaras, Associate Editor

Is your favorite model on the cover? Tweet us at @ruelala.

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August 18, 2014

We celebrate the clothes and the models. But now? It’s time we took a moment to appreciate the geniuses behind the lens.

1. She took the last professional photo of John Lennon. You better believe Annie Leibovitz is all rock ‘n’ roll.

2. The British Royal Family has repeatedly employed Mario Testino. Any questions?

3. Richard Avedon‘s subjects ranged from Marilyn Monroe to John Kerry. Now that’s a portfolio.

4. If it’s femininity at its finest, you know Ellen von Unwerth created it.

5. Imagine being able to put “I shot the first cover of American Vogue” on your resume. Peter Lindbergh can.

Can’t get enough Pinterest inspiration? Check out past boards that caught our eye.

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November 5, 2013

Kate Winslet’s November Vogue cover. I’m not the first to say it – this thing is airbrushed. Her eyes glitter. Her skin’s porcelain-doll smooth. It’s miles away from the Kate we know, the one America fell in love with years ago. Voluptuous and identifiable and real. And that’s exactly why I think the public has reacted so strongly against it.

But I ask – what if we look at Kate’s airbrushing in an entirely different light? What if we view her cover not as reality (à la the old Kate), but as art? Would it upset us less?

When photography was invented in the 1830s, art was revolutionized. There was no need for realism, for portraying every last tiny detail of a subject. The camera could do that. Instead, we painted impressions. Brushy strokes. Cubist figures. We interpreted.

In a sense, Kate’s Vogue cover is doing the same thing. It’s an intentional interpretation of a woman. We are not meant to believe this is Kate as she wakes up in the morning. Or even red-carpet Kate. It is a fantasy. A bit of escapism. And, upset as I may be that the old Kate is gone, isn’t that what art is all about?

By Joanna Berliner, Editor

So, what do you think? Tweet us at @ruelala with #inmyopinion and let us know. 

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October 17, 2013

 

Last week marked the opening of not one, but two, retrospectives at the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston devoted to the 30-year career of photographer Mario Testino. The event brought the likes of Anna Wintour, Olivia Palermo, Erin Wasson, Gisele Bündchen, Alessandra Ambrosio, and Karlie Kloss to Beantown – which is not at all surprising, given the diversity of Mario’s images and his unique relationship to his subjects.

The first exhibit, Mario Testino: British Royal Portraits, showcases the Peruvian-born lensman’s candid and formal portraits of England’s royal family – from an impromptu 1976 shot of the Queen Mother and her grandson Prince Edward to Mario’s gorgeous photos of Princess Diana and recent engagement portraits of Buckingham Palace’s newest glamour couple, Prince William and Kate Middleton. This is the first U.S. showing of many of these images, which Mario handpicked for the retrospective.
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November 2, 2012