History in the Making: Alexander McQueen’s Iconic Skull Scarf

Alexander McQueen’s iconic silk skull-print scarf (you know, the one featured in every major magazine) has been oh-so-coveted since the day it debuted. Here, discover how the celebrated accessory – and its label – came to be such an It-crowd staple.

How to Wear the Iconic Skull Scarf

1992: British designer Lee Alexander McQueen graduates from the prestigious MA course at Central Saint Martins College of Arts and Design, London.

1993: He presents his first collection, Taxi Driver, under his namesake label Alexander McQueen on a clothing rack at The Ritz London.

2003: Ten years after making his debut, Lee introduces the iconic skull-print scarf in his Spring/Summer 2003 Collection.

2013: To celebrate the scarf’s ten-year anniversary, the label taps British artist Damien Hirst to create a 30-piece limited-edition line.

Today: Available in over 60 color combinations, the original skull scarf has solidified itself as a fashion-fanatic must-have – adding a little edge to outfits everywhere.

Our 10 Ways to Wear: The Lightweight Scarf Boutique opens Friday, March 21, at 3PM ET.

By Brianna Lapolla, Staff Writer

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March 21, 2014

Covet This: A New Take on McQueen’s Skull Scarf

Lovers of Alexander McQueen’s iconic skull scarf, heads up: to celebrate the accessory’s 10th anniversary, the brand has teamed up with fellow British designer Damien Hirst to launch an exclusive line of skull-inspired scarves.

The 30-piece collection will blend McQueen’s skull imagery with (drumroll) bugs.

It works, we promise. See?

Skull Scarf

Image via Fashionista

The line is available in-stores and on alexandermcqueen.com starting this Friday, November 15. Which means, Mom – hint, hint – that’s more than enough time for you to purchase one and put a bow on it.

Okay, fine. A girl can dream.

Read more about the collab at Fashionista.

By Joanna Berliner, Editor

Are you excited? Tweet us at @ruelala and let us know.

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November 13, 2013

Instant Inspiration: 5 Pinterest Boards We Can’t Get Enough Of

A Tuesday roundup of our recent Pinterest obsessions

Paris Fashion Week is about to bid us all adieu. Tear. So let’s take a moment to fall in love (again) with each of these fashion greats.

1. We could say a lot of things about Alexander McQueen but, for now, we’ll just say this: hauntingly beautiful.

2. Can we have a closet full of Lanvin? We promise we’ll take good care of it.

3. Valentino. Because if Jackie O loved it, so do we.

4. Let’s be real. Is there any fashion logo more iconic than Chanel‘s “CC”?

5. We adore Christian Dior. (Who doesn’t?)

Can’t get enough Pinterest inspiration? Check out past boards that caught our eye.  

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October 1, 2013

The Bad Boys of Fashion: 4 Edgy Designers We Can’t Get Enough Of

Sometimes, being bad just feels good – and it’s a sentiment that’s never more present than in the fashion world. From provocative ad campaigns to sartorial gambles, when it comes to this industry, the edgier you are the better. Just check out a few of our favorite bad boy designers (and try not to swoon).

Marc Jacobs: Jacobs introduced his namesake line in 1986 and went on to become the youngest designer ever to win the CFDA Perry Ellis Award for New Fashion Talent.
Bad-Boy Cred: Known as America’s bad boy of fashion, Jacobs boasts over 30 tattoos (one being SpongeBob) and constantly makes waves at Fashion Week with his use of unexpected models and backward runway shows. What he’ll do next is anyone’s guess.

Alexander McQueen: The late McQueen’s first collection debuted in 1994 and was bought in its entirety by fashion editor Isabella Blow. After the designer’s untimely death in 2010, Sarah Burton took over as the new Creative Director.
Bad-Boy Cred: McQueen dropped out of school at 16 to pursue a career in fashion. He was known for his unconventional designs and runway shock tactics. Case in point: during his S/S 1999 show, model Shalom Harlow stood on a turntable while robots spray-painted her dress.

Jean Paul Gaultier: After working for Pierre Cardin and Jean Patou, Gaultier set out to create his own womenswear line, and his first couture collection debuted in 1997. From 2004 to 2010, he served as the head womenswear designer of Hermès.
Bad-Boy Cred: His nickname is “Enfant Terrible,” which translates to “terrible child.” In 1990, the designer – known for challenging the standard views of fashion – collaborated with Madonna to create her infamous cone bra.

Nicola Formichetti: An Italian/Japanese fashion director and editor, Formichetti is most widely known as the new artistic director of DIESEL. In 2010 he was awarded the Isabella Blow Award for Fashion Creator.
Bad-Boy Cred: The motto of the man who created Lady Gaga’s infamous meat dress? “F*** fashion, because I love it so much I want to destroy it and start again and keep it fresh.”

Shop our favorite bad-boy designers with our Bad Boys of Fashion: Featuring Alexander McQueen Boutique, which opened Wednesday, April 24, at 11AM ET.

By Keriann Coffey, Associate Blog Editor

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April 24, 2013