If you’ve been confused by the growing number of men showing off stubble this month, let me reassure you – it has little to do with the oncoming threat of snow.

It’s Movember, a month where men grow moustaches to build awareness for prostate-cancer research.

And, I have to say, I’m in love.

No, I don’t love the feeling of stubble on my cheek or have a quarter-life urge to take home a mountain man – despite recent findings by scientific journal Evolution and Human Behavior, which state that women see men with facial hair as more attractive than their clean-shaven counterparts.

In fact, I abhor stubble. But I’m in love with the simple fact that Movember has lightened up the act of raising money for men’s health. This is no somber vigil or all-day walkathon. It’s an act of raising awareness that is easily integrated into a man’s everyday life. One that is happily tweeted, Instagrammed, and discussed around dinner tables, over cubes, and in locker rooms.

Movember has achieved exactly what it set out to do: get people talking. And for that, all seasonal-moustache touters should be proud.

By Joanna Berliner, Editor 

So, what do you think? Tweet us at @ruelala with #inmyopinion and let us know. 

Not a Member and like The (Style) Guide? You’ll love Rue La La. Join now.

November 12, 2013

Everything tastes better when it’s free. Or, at least, that’s the motto New York Magazine: The Cut’s latest person of interest lives by – a 24-year-old broke Toronto woman who uses dating sites for the sole purpose of snagging herself free dinner.

According to her Tumblr, Erin Wotherspoon joined “a slew of dating sites to find a man, any man, even a woman to finance [a] delectable venture into the maze of Toronto’s hottest resto nabes.”

Now, maybe it’s just me, but – seriously? Get a job.

Don’t get me wrong. Free is lovely, and I will continue to gladly accept the office-provided Halloween candy that sits in front of me as I type and the occasional boyfriend-gifted Malbec. But the idea of serial dating with the sole purpose of racking up free foie gras and oysters at the city’s “hottest resto nabes” (not a real word – I already Googled it) is, above all else, unfair.

It’s no better than saying, “Hey, I’m looking for marriage,” when you really want a one-night stand. And it only helps to perpetuate the age-old notion that a woman’s livelihood depends on a man.

Which makes me worried for the growing number of today’s singles who seek to find their soulmates on reputable dating sites like… Tinder.

By Joanna Berliner, Editor

So, what do you think? Tweet us at @ruelala with #inmyopinion and let us know. 

Not a Member and like The (Style) Guide? You’ll love Rue La La. Join now.

October 31, 2013

According to the New York Times, the Pacific Crest Trail – a 2,650-mile-long hiking trail which winds its way from Mexico to Canada – has seen “a record number of long-distance hikers this year.” It is no coincidence, the Times continues, that this peak follows the publication of (and obsession with) Cheryl Strayed's 2012 memoir, Wild: From Lost to Found on the Pacific Crest TrailIn fact, they call it “The Wild Effect.”

I prefer to call it, simply, “The Finding-Yourself Effect.” The concept of making an escape to find yourself is hot in the world of memoirs. And I, too, am guilty of getting swept away in the romance. But unlike Strayed, who lost her mother and fell deep into drugs, I’m not reeling from catastrophe. Nor am I stuck in a post-divorce rut, à la 2006's source of inspiration – Eat, Pray, Love's Elizabeth Gilbert. I’m a twentysomething with a good job living in a city that I fall in love with more and more each day.

My father, born in a matchbox of an apartment in the Bronx in the 40s, never would have dreamed of such a thing. The idea of finding yourself – so thrilling to today’s pseudo-intellectual hipsters and hopeless romantics – was a luxury. When I think of him, the idea of finding myself suddenly feels selfish.

So for now, I think, I’ll wait this hype out, stick to finding myself… a coffee… and get back to work. There is a time and place for every big adventure. And today, no matter the memoir du jour, is not one of them.

By Joanna Berliner, Editor 

So, what do you think? Tweet us at @ruelala with #inmyopinion and let us know. 

Not a Member and like The (Style) Guide? You’ll love Rue La La. Join now.

October 24, 2013

"Shrink it and pink it." Sound familiar? It’s a commonly used marketing strategy for women. One the National Football League lived by up until recently. But now, with women comprising roughly 44% of the NFL’s audience, the League has decided to revamp its approach to women.

Their solution? "The Savvy Girl’s Guide to Football" – a 16-page, NFL-sponsored insert in Marie Claire’s September issue. (They also have plans to roll out similar ads in Vogue and Cosmopolitan.)

Inside the advertorial, you can find fashionable football apparel (think tight tees paired with leather leggings), fanicures, and tips on hosting a big-game party.

Now, full disclosure: I am no football fan. But there’s a part of me that still finds this somewhat patronizing. Sure, the shades of pink and glitter may be gone, but the idea that women watch football solely to throw parties while wearing a cute outfit is still there. Things like football glossaries in women’s fashion magazines simply feed into the idea that a female fan knows less than a male fan. And, okay, that may be the case for some of us. But it isn’t the majority.

Some women don’t need a football glossary. They don’t want to know how to make the best game-day chili. And they’re not just in front of the TV on Sunday to impress a boyfriend. Some women just want to – gasp – watch the game, in a regular jersey that fits. Tall order? Not so much.

By Keriann Coffey, Associate Editor

So, what do you think? Tweet us at @ruelala with #inmyopinion and let us know. 

Not a Member and like The (Style) Guide? You’ll love Rue La La. Join now.

October 22, 2013

Kate Winslet’s November Vogue cover. I’m not the first to say it – this thing is airbrushed. Her eyes glitter. Her skin’s porcelain-doll smooth. It’s miles away from the Kate we know, the one America fell in love with years ago. Voluptuous and identifiable and real. And that’s exactly why I think the public has reacted so strongly against it.

But I ask – what if we look at Kate’s airbrushing in an entirely different light? What if we view her cover not as reality (à la the old Kate), but as art? Would it upset us less?

When photography was invented in the 1830s, art was revolutionized. There was no need for realism, for portraying every last tiny detail of a subject. The camera could do that. Instead, we painted impressions. Brushy strokes. Cubist figures. We interpreted.

In a sense, Kate’s Vogue cover is doing the same thing. It’s an intentional interpretation of a woman. We are not meant to believe this is Kate as she wakes up in the morning. Or even red-carpet Kate. It is a fantasy. A bit of escapism. And, upset as I may be that the old Kate is gone, isn’t that what art is all about?

By Joanna Berliner, Editor

So, what do you think? Tweet us at @ruelala with #inmyopinion and let us know. 

Not a Member and like The (Style) Guide? You’ll love Rue La La. Join now.

October 17, 2013

We don’t all look the same naked. Skin shades vary. So when it comes to designing a nude pump – you know, the quickest route to longer, slimmer-looking legs – why should there be just one color option?

Christian Louboutin has responded to that very question, releasing a range of pumps matching various shades of melanin. According to the designer himself,  the shoes “become a fluid extension of her leg, as in a sketch, elongating the silhouette.” Best part? There’s also a Louboutin Shades app. Take a photo of your bare feet and it’ll tell you which shade of nude best suits you.

But, I must ask – why stop at luxe pumps? The concept that not all humans are “nude,” by product-color standards, is long overdue in the fashion world. For now, strides are being made here and there (intimates have begun taking a more realistic path, like these thongs by Cosabella). But what about, say, slips? Handbags? There’s still a long way to go until the norm is actually normal.

Now – excuse me while I go scare up some cash for a pair of my own progressive red-soled wonders.

By Sarah Stanley, Staff Writer

Not a Member and like The (Style) Guide? You’ll love Rue La La. Join now.

October 15, 2013